Weeping Willow Tree

Weeping Willow Seeds

A weeping willow can be a perfect addition to your garden or backyard landscape, bringing shade, privacy, and all around beauty. The tree is a very fast grower, is not easily overwatered, and is so hardy that you can sometimes even root its branches.

But rooting from branches can be tricky, so what other options are there to grow your own weeping willow tree from scratch? If you know how to properly, starting your trees from seeds could be the way to go.

You can buy seeds from plant stores, greenhouses, tree catalogs or even online, or you could even just go up to a willow tree and collect the seeds yourself. Weeping willows produce seeds early in the spring, and many seeds will be packed inside of long capsules found on the ends of the branches.

Like most other plants that you start on your own, it is recommended that you plant willow seeds in pots. The seeds should be about a half inch below the soil, and if you want lots of little willows, make sure the seeds are not crowded. At this stage, keep the seeds moist and well watered without overwatering.

Weeping Willow Seeds

You should see your seedlings begin to come up within about a week and a half. The seedlings should be kept in indirect sunlight, and well watered, although at this stage they will still be fragile and overwatering may be a fatal error.

As the seedlings grow, you may find that you have planted some of them too closely together, and that one of the close seedlings is much stronger than the other(s). If this is the case, determine which seedling appears the strongest and remove the rest.

As said, willows are rapid growers, so be careful that the pots you plant the seeds in will not bind their roots, as this can choke them off and kill them. But when the saplings are at least a foot tall, you can plant them in the ground. It is a good idea to dig a whole large enough that you can plant most of the soil from the pot along with the sapling, as this reduces the shock and stress of a changed environment to the tree.

Again, weeping willows thrive in indirect sunlight and lots of water. When the plants are still in pots, it is a good idea to take their final location into account and place them in indirect sunlight similar to where you will be planting them. Also at this stage, your willow's growth can be furthered by lots of water, so plant near a pond, stream, or even just a place where rainwater collects on the front lawn.


Weeping Willow Tree